On that Greenville grind #roofstagram (at Sip)

On that Greenville grind #roofstagram (at Sip)

Tags: roofstagram

930club:

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 
Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 
-Kelsey Butterworth
Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

930club:

SHOW PREVIEW: I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium 

Thanks to a certain band whose name sounds more like a family-owned soda shoppe, there are a ton of folk-ish bands on the airwaves right now. Not all of them are worth listening to. But First Aid Kit, a Swedish sister duo who do American roots music better than plenty of Americans, have released one of the year’s best in Stay Gold. From the train track rhythm of opening number “Silver Lining,” the sisters reaffirm their place as worthy inheritors of the spooky-sibling-harmonization tradition. Despite Johanna and Klara Söderberg resembling the cast of American Horror Story: Coven, their music is endlessly optimistic, even when it soaks in the regrets of the past. Their music is the perennial soundtrack to every Route 66 road trip, and to that scene in every indie movie where the protagonist Figures It All Out. 

-Kelsey Butterworth

Tickets for I.M.P. Presents First Aid Kit at G.W. Lisner Auditorium go on sale Friday, September 19 at 10am!

Za & Z’s for Grandpa C (at Fry’s Spring Station Restaurant - Fan Page)

Za & Z’s for Grandpa C (at Fry’s Spring Station Restaurant - Fan Page)

UVA got a tad bit zesty after beating Louisville, #GOHOOS (at Scott Stadium)

UVA got a tad bit zesty after beating Louisville, #GOHOOS (at Scott Stadium)

Tags: gohoos

Hoo dat?! (at Scott Stadium)

Hoo dat?! (at Scott Stadium)

930club:

CRATE DIGGIN’: Kermit Ruffins

Beyond The Wire, David Simon’s greatest gift to humanity is the post-Katrina set Treme, which used most of its airtime to pay tribute to the Crescent City’s musical history. It’s featured music by all kinds of local artists, from the classic jazz bounce of Alan Toussaint to the impossibly funky hip-hop of Mystikal. But series standout is Kermit Ruffins, who plays himself as a recurring character on the show. He’s a trumpeter, band leader, and all-around badass who’s such a Nawlins purist that in one episode, he didn’t recognize Elvis Costello sitting in the audience.

Real-life Kermit has been on the scene for over 35 years, during which he’s put out stellar releases that feature a surprising amount of original compositions (not a commonality in the jazz world). Ruffins is also 1/3 responsible for the formation of the Rebirth Brass Band back in 1983. Though he split with them in ‘93 to pursue a solo career, they remain one of the most influential New Orleans groups around, and one of the last ties to its second line past, performing classics like “I Feel Like Funkin’ It Up” and “Do Whatcha Wanna.” Kermit’s solo albums (hint: start with Livin’ a Treme Life) are jam-packed with jubilant blues changes, lush ballads, and impeccably-sung jazz standards. But most importantly, they’ve all got that undeniable New Orleans swagger.

-Kelsey Butterworth

930club:

9:30 INTERVIEW: Trampled by Turtles
Kelsey [9:30]: I know a lot of folks have asked you about your band name over the years. I’m gonna add to that - what kind of turtles do you envision doing the trampling?
Dave Carroll [Trampled by Turtles]: All of them.
Wild Animals and Stars and Satellites seem a little more slowed down and mournful than earlier albums like Palomino. Would you chalk this up to maturation or something else?
We’ve definitely matured as a band over the years.  With Stars and Satellites and Wild Animals, we wanted to do something different than what we’ve done in the past. These albums are a way for us to grow as a band. It’s also really a great experience to slow things down, and think about what we are doing while we are doing it, as opposed to balancing on the edge of a train wreck.
Besides sharing a hometown with Low (and Alan Sparhawk who produced the latest album), how has being from Duluth influenced TBT’s music? I always love when I can get a sense of the band’s native topography through the music.
Duluth is a wonderful city, one might say the best outdoors town in America. However, when the cold wind bites and it is difficult to be outside, it channels a different energy. Artists have months during the winter to learn new skills or form new bands (indoors). Also, the lake (Superior) has a profound impact on all of us. It is pretty amazing.
To you, what’s the most important reason in keeping traditional American roots music alive and relevant?
Playing music using instruments crafted from wood and metal will always be an important part of American roots music. It’s how it all started. 
You guys recorded this album in just a couple of weeks, right? Has the recording process gotten smoother after having six albums under your belt, or are you pickier?
We don’t like to have a time table present when we are recording nowadays. Back in 2004, we were on a much more limited budget and therefore had less time to record. I think we made our 1st record in 4 days. Even though 2 weeks is still a small amount of time, we feel like it allows us to try playing the songs in different ways, using different guitars or banjos etc. We tried a lot of new techniques. It was a blast.
Best food to eat on the road?
Try to find a sweet local restaurant, or eat a salad. We eat salads every day. Ha!
If there was one misconception about your band or the bluegrass genre that you could clear up, what would it be?
Banjos never feedback.
You guys are well known for your excellent live cover of The Pixies’ “Where Is My Mind?” and you recently recorded a great cover of Springsteen’s “I’m Goin’ Down” for a Born In The U.S.A. tribute. Are there any other songs you’ve been dying to cover?
"Owner of a Lonely Heart" by Yes.
Flip side of that: what would be your dream scenario for another band covering one of your songs?
Bruce Springsteen.
What’s the best new music you’ve heard recently?
I’m a huge fan of Warpaint’s new record, although I think it came out last year.
Who are you most excited to see at the Route 29 Revue?
Hurray for the Riff Raff. They kill it.
Last question, because you know the fans want to know – how do y’all keep your beards so fluffy and voluminous?
Conditioner!
-Kelsey Butterworth
See Trampled by Turtles at Route 29 Revue on Saturday, September 13 at Merriweather Post Pavilion!

930club:

9:30 INTERVIEW: Trampled by Turtles

Kelsey [9:30]: I know a lot of folks have asked you about your band name over the years. I’m gonna add to that - what kind of turtles do you envision doing the trampling?

Dave Carroll [Trampled by Turtles]: All of them.

Wild Animals and Stars and Satellites seem a little more slowed down and mournful than earlier albums like Palomino. Would you chalk this up to maturation or something else?

We’ve definitely matured as a band over the years.  With Stars and Satellites and Wild Animals, we wanted to do something different than what we’ve done in the past. These albums are a way for us to grow as a band. It’s also really a great experience to slow things down, and think about what we are doing while we are doing it, as opposed to balancing on the edge of a train wreck.

Besides sharing a hometown with Low (and Alan Sparhawk who produced the latest album), how has being from Duluth influenced TBT’s music? I always love when I can get a sense of the band’s native topography through the music.

Duluth is a wonderful city, one might say the best outdoors town in America. However, when the cold wind bites and it is difficult to be outside, it channels a different energy. Artists have months during the winter to learn new skills or form new bands (indoors). Also, the lake (Superior) has a profound impact on all of us. It is pretty amazing.

To you, what’s the most important reason in keeping traditional American roots music alive and relevant?

Playing music using instruments crafted from wood and metal will always be an important part of American roots music. It’s how it all started. 

You guys recorded this album in just a couple of weeks, right? Has the recording process gotten smoother after having six albums under your belt, or are you pickier?

We don’t like to have a time table present when we are recording nowadays. Back in 2004, we were on a much more limited budget and therefore had less time to record. I think we made our 1st record in 4 days. Even though 2 weeks is still a small amount of time, we feel like it allows us to try playing the songs in different ways, using different guitars or banjos etc. We tried a lot of new techniques. It was a blast.

Best food to eat on the road?

Try to find a sweet local restaurant, or eat a salad. We eat salads every day. Ha!

If there was one misconception about your band or the bluegrass genre that you could clear up, what would it be?

Banjos never feedback.

You guys are well known for your excellent live cover of The Pixies’ “Where Is My Mind?” and you recently recorded a great cover of Springsteen’s “I’m Goin’ Down” for a Born In The U.S.A. tribute. Are there any other songs you’ve been dying to cover?

"Owner of a Lonely Heart" by Yes.

Flip side of that: what would be your dream scenario for another band covering one of your songs?

Bruce Springsteen.

What’s the best new music you’ve heard recently?

I’m a huge fan of Warpaint’s new record, although I think it came out last year.

Who are you most excited to see at the Route 29 Revue?

Hurray for the Riff Raff. They kill it.

Last question, because you know the fans want to know – how do y’all keep your beards so fluffy and voluminous?

Conditioner!

-Kelsey Butterworth

See Trampled by Turtles at Route 29 Revue on Saturday, September 13 at Merriweather Post Pavilion!

Jake Bugg was absolutely elated to play Atlanta and did not at all act like a scrawny Augustus Gloop in a Guitar Center (at Central Park Atlantic Station)

Jake Bugg was absolutely elated to play Atlanta and did not at all act like a scrawny Augustus Gloop in a Guitar Center (at Central Park Atlantic Station)

The Wild Feathers at Parklife! (at Central Park Atlantic Station)

The Wild Feathers at Parklife! (at Central Park Atlantic Station)

930club:

VOTD: The Magic Numbers - “E.N.D.”

Slowly but surely, disco has been creeping back into our collective vocabulary. Hints of it were found in the new Jenny Lewis track “She’s Not Me,” and HAIM’s debut emulated the sparkling production of the ’70s and ’80s. But the newest Magic Numbers tune “The End” makes NO bones about what it’s going for. It’s velvet-Elvis-portrait smooth, with Bee Gees hand claps and violin straight out of that one Goofy Movie scene. Strangely, the other tunes on their latest record Alias go for completely different styles. “Shot In The Dark” is a jangly, roots-y strummer; “Roy Orbison” is full of doo-wop vibes. Moral of the story: the Magic Numbers are great at reinterpreting the musical past.

-Kelsey Butterworth

930club:

NEW TRACKS: Benjamin Booker, “Violent Shiver”

We can pretty much count on ATO Records to turn out a steady stream of great roots-oriented garage rock. The latest from these fine folks is Benjamin Booker, a New Orleans-based blues punker (influences include The Gun Club and T. Rex). His song “Violent Shiver” is just off-kilter enough to feel like true rock and roll. It tumbles out of your speakers with manic blues licks and passionately shouted choruses giving way to soulfully muttered verses. Keep an eye on this one.

-Kelsey Butterworth

See Benjamin Booker on Monday, October 20 at U Street Music Hall!

930club:

SIDE NOTES: Arcade Fire Covers

Arcade Fire’s massive Reflektor Tour just wrapped up in the group’s native Montreal, and throughout the run’s 74 shows, nothing was more newsworthy than the band’s eclectic cover choices. D.C. was treated to the seminal Fugazi tune “Waiting Room,” and the group covered Blondie’s “Heart of Glass” with none other than Debbie Harry (side note to the Side Note: this writer totally called this back in December ‘13). Setlist.fm compiled, you guessed it, the tour’s set lists, and Consequence of Sound compiled fan footage of most of the covers. We’ve always known that Arcade Fire pull from a wide swath of musical history to create their continuing art project of a musical collective, but seeing all the covers in one place sheds interesting light on their influences. It’s easy to see R.E.M.’s jangly guitar reflected (reflekted?) in the heavy reverb Arcade Fire have always favored, and Bo Diddley’s renowned rhythmic sensibilities line up nicely next to the bongo-heavy Reflektor. Perhaps more surprising are covers of groups like Boyz II Men and INXS, but unpredictability is what makes Arcade Fire’s sustained rise to indie dominance so exhilarating. 

-Kelsey Butterworth

#redout (at Between the Hedges)

#redout (at Between the Hedges)

Tags: redout

Game day in the Gnomeberhood

Game day in the Gnomeberhood

"Paint our name on them road cases / Stencil and white spray paint / Drive-By Truckers on every one / Or maybe just D-B-T"

"Paint our name on them road cases / Stencil and white spray paint / Drive-By Truckers on every one / Or maybe just D-B-T"