930club:

HOW DID I MISS THIS?!: Eels

I feel like every HDIMT installment should begin with a sincere apology to the universe and the band in question, followed by an admission of severe embarrassment. I have no idea how I avoided Eels for so long – fear of a new obsession? Sheer laziness? Even after all the recent hubbub over them singing with Steve Perry, I still managed to duck and cover. (In my defense, there are a CRAP TON of bands to listen to out there. Ever rifle through a $1 vinyl bin? It gives me the sads.) But after hearing “Flyswatter,” my god, have I seen the light. Though I’m only just beginning my journey with Daisies of the Galaxy, I’ve come to a few conclusions thus far: Eels , Beck, and The Apples In Stereo would be the best of friends; Mark Everett is nothing less than a bonafide musical genius; despite the annoying 43-second intro of silence and feedback, “Mr. E’s Beautiful Blues” is quite possibly the most awesome song EVER. What I love about 90s/00s wacko indie songwriters is their ability to cover topics more diverse and intellectually stimulating than “Mwah, my girl/boyfriend broke up with me” (take The Dismemberment Plan’s thrilling loony tune “Bra,” for instance). And judging by my endless Spotify scrolling, I’ve got plenty of wacko discography to dig into. Cheers, Mr. Everett.

-Kelsey Butterworth

pitchforkreviewsreviews:

Das Racist put out their second mixtape about a year ago and Ian Cohen, a combination entertainment lawyer/Pitchfork reviewer, gave it an 8.7, the second-highest Pitchfork score any mixtape has gotten. Three days later I interviewed Hima (one of the rappers in Das Racist) and suggested to him that…

Wow wow wow. The Nashville Jam at the end of last night’s @MusicCityRoots - @AmericanAquarium, @SongsOfWater, Irene Kelley, @TheVespers, and @JimLauderdale1 jamming on “I’ll Fly Away” (at Factory at Franklin)

Wow wow wow. The Nashville Jam at the end of last night’s @MusicCityRoots - @AmericanAquarium, @SongsOfWater, Irene Kelley, @TheVespers, and @JimLauderdale1 jamming on “I’ll Fly Away” (at Factory at Franklin)

American Aquarium at Music City Roots! @jasonisbell would be proud (at Factory at Franklin)

American Aquarium at Music City Roots! @jasonisbell would be proud (at Factory at Franklin)

930club:

ALBUM REVIEW: The Antlers, Familiars
How can you tell that a band is growing up? I promise this isn’t a dumb joke where the punch line is “they start getting AARP letters.” To me, it’s the use of negative space – embracing the idea that silence can be just as much of an instrument as anything turned up to 11. Why do you think Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” is widely considered one of his greatest songs? It’s all about restraint as a show of force.
So by that metric, The Antlers must be mature as all get out. Their June release Familiars is less guitar-driven than their past work; there’s room to breathe. Even the song titles (single words, as with their 2009 offering Hospice) tell just enough of the story to make you press repeat. But don’t mistake their breathy sonic cosmos for a lack of complexity – drummer Michael Lerner adds texture by giving his many rhythmic tools all a shot, similarly to the infamous Kings of Leon tune “I Want You.” Darby Cicci works overtime playing not just Beirut-tinted trumpet, but bass, keyboards, and synths, which range from swirling spaceship to Sunday church. And Vocalist Peter Silberman is no stranger to diverse instrumentation, pairing his powerfully conservative vocals with heavily reverbed, slightly jazzy guitar work.
This record is full of regret and hard-earned advice given to a blurry audience, culled from lonely years on the road. Take “Hotel”: “When I check out / It won’t matter how my name’s spelled / Cause when you pass through / You only keep what you can’t sell” croon-wails Silberman, whose sexy, mournful falsetto gives the songs just the right touch of wintry soul. The stilted piano “Doppelgänger” has a fun house effect, only strengthened with the mirroring of Z-era My Morning Jacket “ooh”-ing. “Surrender” sounds like a super mega chill Vampire Weekend. “Refuge” sounds like a slightly less sad Shy Girls. Pretty much all of the songs borrow from the xx. You get the idea – these Brooklyn boys have perfectly captured a lazy, weary Manhattan afternoon. The genius of these hooks is not in their Top 40 brashness, but in their subtlety; instead of boring the listener after spin #4, they get settled in and truly stick.
-Kelsey Butterworth
The Antlers will perform at 9:30 Club on July 25.

930club:

ALBUM REVIEW: The Antlers, Familiars

How can you tell that a band is growing up? I promise this isn’t a dumb joke where the punch line is “they start getting AARP letters.” To me, it’s the use of negative space – embracing the idea that silence can be just as much of an instrument as anything turned up to 11. Why do you think Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire” is widely considered one of his greatest songs? It’s all about restraint as a show of force.

So by that metric, The Antlers must be mature as all get out. Their June release Familiars is less guitar-driven than their past work; there’s room to breathe. Even the song titles (single words, as with their 2009 offering Hospice) tell just enough of the story to make you press repeat. But don’t mistake their breathy sonic cosmos for a lack of complexity – drummer Michael Lerner adds texture by giving his many rhythmic tools all a shot, similarly to the infamous Kings of Leon tune “I Want You.” Darby Cicci works overtime playing not just Beirut-tinted trumpet, but bass, keyboards, and synths, which range from swirling spaceship to Sunday church. And Vocalist Peter Silberman is no stranger to diverse instrumentation, pairing his powerfully conservative vocals with heavily reverbed, slightly jazzy guitar work.

This record is full of regret and hard-earned advice given to a blurry audience, culled from lonely years on the road. Take “Hotel”: “When I check out / It won’t matter how my name’s spelled / Cause when you pass through / You only keep what you can’t sell” croon-wails Silberman, whose sexy, mournful falsetto gives the songs just the right touch of wintry soul. The stilted piano “Doppelgänger” has a fun house effect, only strengthened with the mirroring of Z-era My Morning Jacket “ooh”-ing. “Surrender” sounds like a super mega chill Vampire Weekend. “Refuge” sounds like a slightly less sad Shy Girls. Pretty much all of the songs borrow from the xx. You get the idea – these Brooklyn boys have perfectly captured a lazy, weary Manhattan afternoon. The genius of these hooks is not in their Top 40 brashness, but in their subtlety; instead of boring the listener after spin #4, they get settled in and truly stick.

-Kelsey Butterworth

The Antlers will perform at 9:30 Club on July 25.

930club:

NEW TRACKS: The Rural Alberta Advantage, “Terrified”

Few do minor key indie rock better than the Rural Alberta Advantage. The Canadian trio makes a racket on their excellent new single “Terrified.” The song begins with southwestern-flared strumming until it brings in, in rapid succession, Nils Edenloff’s tortured, old soul falsetto and the one-two-three punch of the rest of the group. “Terrified” does indeed make love sound terrifying, especially considering all this talk about a woman holding a knife. The tune clocks in just over three minutes and absolutely rocks. With a couple of EPs and two full-lengths under their belts, RAA is set to drop Mended With Gold on September 30.

-Kelsey Butterworth 

Y’all. Unlike this grainy photo, HOSTS is the real deal. Check them out on twitter @HostsMusic and on Facebook and all that jazz (at Just 3 Guyz)

Y’all. Unlike this grainy photo, HOSTS is the real deal. Check them out on twitter @HostsMusic and on Facebook and all that jazz (at Just 3 Guyz)

💽 (at Grimey’s Too)

💽 (at Grimey’s Too)

930club:

NEW TRACKS: Death From Above 1979, “Trainwreck 1979”

In terms of important recent musical reunions, Death From Above 1979 is to Free People-inhabiting punk rock fans what Outkast is to 90s kids from the Greater Atlanta Metro Area. The duo’s rise in popularity, with their only LP to date (2004’s You’re a Woman, I’m a Machine), came as quickly as their sudden and odd demise – they decided to break up in 2005 after months of infighting but kept it secret for a year in their label’s hopes that they’d change their mind. They announced a reunion back in 2011, and here now is the first single from their upcoming September release Physical World. Already, they sound more polished than their first go-round (relatively, of course, since this is a drums and bass punk rock band we’re talking about). Between the fist-pumping vocals, heart-stopping riffs, and awesome lyric video featuring custom vintage-y buttons, September can’t come fast enough.

-Kelsey Butterworth

🇩🇪 @angeschbach @remmie_drury  (at Flying Saucer Nashville)

🇩🇪 @angeschbach @remmie_drury (at Flying Saucer Nashville)

Crappy graphic I made to show that irony can be a cruel mistress

Crappy graphic I made to show that irony can be a cruel mistress

930club:

MUSIC MONDAY PLAYLIST: Kelsey’s Picks - PBR&B Existentialcore

The best of the best existentialcore (exi for short?) is thought-provoking, textured, and well-read. These PBR&B songs draw as much from the hip-hop drum tracks of yesteryear as they do from Irish and Mexican folk music. They might be a little heavy, but just like incompetent personal trainer Ray said on Veep: “You know, the brain is a muscle.”

930club:

NEW TRACKS: Jason Isbell & Amanda Shires, “Born In The USA”

June 4 marked the 30th anniversary of the Boss’ seminal and generation-defining Born In The USA, an album that has gone platinum in the US alone 15 times over. For this special anniversary, Nashville’s Lightning Rod Records will release Dead Man’s Town: A Tribute to Born In The USA on September 16. Each classic track will be covered by a different artist, with their spin put upon it. Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, often called the “First Couple of Americana,” open up this endeavor with their take on the title track. While the original’s jaunty bombast masks the lyrics whose woefulness casual listeners so often gloss over, Isbell’s and Shires’ cover is haunting, sparse, and foreboding. Chances are this version won’t get played at any political rallies.

-Kelsey Butterworth

Perks of blog staffin’ for the greatest music venue on earth. Love ya @930club.

Perks of blog staffin’ for the greatest music venue on earth. Love ya @930club.

#nofilter #throwbackAmerica

#nofilter #throwbackAmerica